Stories

NOURISHMENT

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In order to plant, a farmer needs tools to till the soil and seeds to sow. The fields must be fertile. Rain must fall at the right time and in the right amount. Only when these conditions are met will the harvest be bountiful. Any break in the cycle of planting and harvesting can result in the farmer’s having no crop to sell at market or to eat. But for each potential problem, there are potential solutions. Organizations around the world employ an array of strategies to alleviate hunger by using local resources. From Africa to the Americas, communities are building capacity to feed themselves.

The Darfur conflict has disrupted farming and increased food insecurity. Many subsistence farmers struggle to grow enough food to meet their families’ daily needs. Instability restricts farmers’ ability to transport their crops to market, leading to inflated prices of basic foodstuffs.

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OUTCASTS FIND ACCEPTANCE

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OUTCASTS FIND ACCEPTANCE

Leprosy is a chronic bacterial disease that disfigures the body and damages the nerves. Believed by many to be permanent and highly contagious, it is in fact neither.

According to the World Health Organization, leprosy can be fully cured with multidrug therapy (MDT). Although there is a simple cure, the disease remains highly endemic in India and other countries.

If not treated early enough leprosy can cause considerable damage to the body.

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REVEALING ABILITY

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REVEALING ABILITY

Patrick Hughes thought of himself as a “normal” undergraduate. He played rugby, joined a fraternity at the University of Kansas and, like most young adults, struggled to figure out his direction in life. Patrick became friends with Jay, a young man on campus, after striking up a conversation about music. The two went to fraternity events, study sessions and sports matches together. Because Jay had autism, Patrick’s other friends questioned their friendship and avoided interacting with Jay. Patrick began to reflect on why including Jay in his “regular life” was so challenging. He realized that people with disabilities experience devastating isolation because the world can be so unwelcoming. “Who is making it difficult for them to be included? Is it them? Or us?” he asks.

Although disability does not negate an individual’s desire to be accepted, it can change how society treats them. The following efforts recognize how damaging exclusion is to those with disabilities. Inclusion Solutions, Higher Ground and the Disability Foundation assist individuals of all abilities to reverse exclusion and accomplish both everyday and extraordinary goals.

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RELEARNING TRUST

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RELEARNING TRUST

Sasmita’s mother was a prostitute, and she did not know her father. She and her brother often did not have food to eat. She was hungry. At eight years old, she had no money for the nominal school fees. Sasmita was at risk for trafficking. After being found on the streets, she was brought to the Peace Rehabilitation Center (PRC) in Kathmandu, Nepal, a community that takes in girls affected by trafficking. Now she attends school and has a safe place to sleep and meals each day. Curious and playful, she is constantly singing with the other girls in the home. Her future is bright as is her smile. Learn more about sell Rolex.

Human trafficking hits deep in poor rural regions of the world. In Nepal, where women’s equality is not yet realized, women are given a backseat to their lives. Culturally, domestic violence is often overlooked, even by women. Residual caste systems and overall male dominance are considered socially acceptable. Women are often victimized simply because they are viewed as inferior.

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DESTROYED IN A WEEK

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DESTROYED IN A WEEK

When Georgia gained independence amid the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, its vibrant agriculture- and tourism-based economy disintegrated. Two regional ethnic groups, the Abkhazians and the Ossetians, sought to create independent states within Georgia’s borders.

The resulting bloody civil war ended in a relative stalemate a year later after the conflict had displaced hundreds of thousands from their homes. Most of Georgia’s citizens became subsistence farmers. Aid organizations such as Action Against Hunger, Mercy Corps and United Methodist Committee on Relief (UMCOR) worked to help impoverished Georgians improve their agricultural practices, build infrastructure and meet their health care needs.

In August 2008 war again broke out between the Georgian government and separatist factions. Russian forces engaged in the conflict, citing “Georgian belligerence against Russian citizens.”

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SHOVELING OUT HAITI

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SHOVELING OUT HAITI

The location of Gonaives, Haiti is both a blessing and a curse. Situated on a floodplain, it has rich agricultural potential but is under constant threat of flooding, which is aggravated by extreme deforestation.

Water rushes over riverbanks down the bare surrounding mountains, and even with light rain, mud often settles in the port city. When hurricane season hits, people’s livelihoods are washed away, exacerbating the plight of the Western Hemisphere’s poorest country. As the water subsides, mud is left in homes, schools and churches, bringing everyday life to a halt.

Tropical storm Jeanne struck in 2004, causing 3,000 deaths and massive destruction. Gonaives residents were still recovering when four tropical storms and hurricanes pummeled Haiti in 2008. Fay’s flash floods swept away a bus full of passengers.

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